Labor History in 2:00
April 20 The Bravest of Conductors

April 20 The Bravest of Conductors

April 20, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1853.  That was the day that Harriet Tubman led her first trip on the underground railroad, the clandestine network that helped enslaved people escape slavery and move north to freedom.  One of the most remembered ‘conductors’ on the railroad, Tubman had herself escaped slavery in eastern Maryland.  

April 18 Labor’s First Lawyer

April 18 Labor’s First Lawyer

April 18, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1857. That was the day that Clarence Darrow was born in Kinsman, Ohio.  Darrow was perhaps the original U.S. labor lawyer.  Known to be a friend to underdogs, Darrow once supposedly said, “Lost causes are the only ones worth fighting for.” 

April 17 Corporate Criminals Know No Borders

April 17 Corporate Criminals Know No Borders

April 17, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1912. That a day of tragedy for workers in the goldfields of Siberia.  Gold miners by the Lena River in Southeast Siberia worked under brutal conditions. The Lena Gold Mining Joint Stock Company ran the mining operation. The lucrative gold fields lined the pockets of shareholders, including Russian aristocracy and British industrialists.  

April 16 Another Day in the Class War

April 16 Another Day in the Class War

April 16, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 2000. That was the beginning of a two-day rally in Washington D.C to protest the gathering of world leaders for the World Bank and The International Monetary Fund or what is known as the A-16 summit. The event was a continuation of the massive protest that disrupted the World Trade Organization’s meeting the year before in Seattle, Washington.  

April 15 From the Classroom to the Streets

April 15 From the Classroom to the Streets

April 15, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1916. That was day that the American Federation of Teachers was founded at a meeting at the City Club in downtown Chicago. Three Chicago teachers groups helped to organize the meeting. They were convinced that in order to improve working conditions for teachers they would need to formally join the labor movement.  

April 14 More Un-American Worker Suppression

April 14 More Un-American Worker Suppression

April 14, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1930. That was the day that 114 agricultural laborers inCalifornia’s Imperial Valley paid a harsh price for joining together to try andimprove their working conditions. The Great Depression was worsening the already difficultconditions faced by California farm laborers. 

April 13 Laborers’ Join Together

April 13 Laborers’ Join Together

April 13, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1903. That was the year the day that twenty-five delegates from seventeen cities gathered in Washington, D.C. to discuss forming a union for laborers. General laborers, who often performed some of the most back-breaking work on projects like digging canals or surfacing streets, were often blocked from joining craft unions as full members. 

April 12 Finally Enough to Stand Up

April 12 Finally Enough to Stand Up

April 12, 2016
On this day in Labor History the year was 1934.  That was the day that workers at the Toledo Auto-Lite factory decided to go out on strike.  The company made electric starters for the auto giants in nearby Detroit.  The punishing effects of the Great Depression had hit the auto industry hard.  
April 11 Terrorists try to Silence Workers

April 11 Terrorists try to Silence Workers

April 11, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1934.  That was the day that labor organizer Frank Norman disappeared from the Lakeland, Florida area and was never heard from again.  It is believed he was kidnapped and murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan. Norman was organizing citrus workers in the northern part of the state.  

April 10  In the Streets Against Cruelty

April 10 In the Streets Against Cruelty

April 10, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 2006. That was the day of massive protests for immigrants’ rights in cities throughout the United States. Starting in March of 2006, there was a series of coordinated protests in response to a bill passed by the US House of Representatives. The bill would classify undocumented workers as felons, and proposed a wall along one-third of the US-Mexico border.  

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