Labor History in 2:00
March 21, 2016  The Beginning of the End of Apartheid

March 21, 2016 The Beginning of the End of Apartheid

March 21, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1960. That was the day of the Sharpeville, Massacre in South Africa. Black South Africans were required to carry identification documents. These passes limited who could live or work in designated “white” areas of the country.  

March 20, 2016   The Birth of the Republican Party

March 20, 2016 The Birth of the Republican Party

March 20, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1854. That was the day that the founders of what became the Republican Party met in Ripon, Wisconsin. The idea was to form a new party, opposed to the Southern labor system based on slavery. That July the Republicans held their first convention in Michigan.  

March 19, 2016  The Tree of Solidarity

March 19, 2016 The Tree of Solidarity

March 19, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1834.  That was the day that six Englishmen, who would become known as the Tolpuddle Martyrs were sentenced to seven years “transportation” to the penal colony of Australia.  Their crime?  Forming a union.  

March 18, 2016  Dancing into the Streets

March 18, 2016 Dancing into the Streets

March 18, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1968. That was the day that the staff at radio station KMPX in San Francisco went on strike. The radio station had broken new ground with their “underground rock” format. In 1967, the station hired Tom “Big Daddy” Donahue as a DJ.  

March 17, 2016 The Fight for the 8 Hour Day

March 17, 2016 The Fight for the 8 Hour Day

March 17, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1890.  That was the day that the executive council of the American Federation of Labor decided that the Carpenters union should lead a national campaign for the eight-hour day. The cry “eight hours for work, eight hours for rest, eight hours for what we will!” had been on the lips of working people for more than twenty years.  

March 16, 2016  The Voice of Freedom

March 16, 2016 The Voice of Freedom

March 16, 2016

“Too long have others spoken for us." Those were the words published On this day in Labor History the year was 1827. This was the message of the co-editors of the Freeman’s Journal, the first black newspaper in the United States. Slavery had been outlawed in New York that same year. 

March 15, 2016  Bruce!

March 15, 2016 Bruce!

March 15, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1999. That was the day the Bruce Springsteen was inducted into the Rocking Roll Hall of Fame.

Two years later, an article in Rolling Stone magazine read, “For nearly four decades Bruce Springsteen has been a working-class hero: a plainspoken visionary and a sincere romantic whose insights into everyday lives — especially in America's small-town heartland — have earned comparisons to John Steinbeck and Woody Guthrie.”  

March 14, 2016 Bread Yes, but Roses Too

March 14, 2016 Bread Yes, but Roses Too

March 14, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1912. That was the day that participants in the famed Bread and Roses strike, gathered in Lawrence, Massachusetts to celebrate their victory. The strike had begun in January and was a hard-fought battle. 

March 13, 2016  Fighting Back against Inequality

March 13, 2016 Fighting Back against Inequality

March 13, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1946. That was the day that United Autoworkers members won an 18.5-cent hourly raise after a four-month strike against General Motors.  After World War II workers grew increasingly frustrated.  

March 12, 2016 Gandhi’s Salt March

March 12, 2016 Gandhi’s Salt March

March 12, 2016

On this day in Labor History the year was 1930. That was the day that Mahatma Gandhi began his famous Salt March. The March was to protest British colonial rule of India and the repressive salt tax waged on the Indian people.  Under British rule, Indian people were prohibited from producing salt. 

 

 

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